Adaeze Ogbonna

My nation’s in a season of separation, degradation fueled by devastation
The autumn leaves fall black from segregation
Black.
Segregation.
It’s the root of our nation.
Windswept tears trickle down the eyes of my oppression
Depression, succession into the arms of the unmentioned
Coldness creeps into the hardened of hearts
Winter bleeds the heart torn blue
Black not blue

Black
Who I am from the inside out
Bullet holes expanding from the outside in
Wear your Kevlar vest of all lives matter
And tell me does it matter if the matter that once created us is tattered, battered, scattered producing a closed case file with oh he didn’t matter

Pick up your teddy bear and burn it young soldier
Medallions will consume your military wounds
Headshot picture of your first headshot victim
Enlist him
Kick him
Before he says mommy where’s daddy, I miss him
Heart
Torn
Blanket
Torn
War torn peace

Peace
Unachievable
Peace
Unreachable
Under the rule of the inconceivable
Leader
Captain oh captain take my body and lead me into the shipwreck
And when I scream tie me down you roughneck
3 months in jail but first let me cut you that blank check

Checkmark my liberty and give me the liberty to ban away the rights that ban away my rights to establish justice and ensure domestic tranquility
Provide for the common defense?
Provide for my common defense and defend the defenseless instead of hiding behind your defense mechanisms of denial
Repression
Regression
It all turns into aggression

A hazy cloud of self-hatred transferred on to a passing me, a passing you
Surpassing you with my belief that tomorrow will be a better day
I pray
And Allah listens
Assalamualaikum
HaShem listens
Shalom aleichem
God listens
Peace be with you
And also, with your spirit
In spirit we rise, as one tribe, unified with the guide that together we are strong than they will ever be

And oh yes, we will succeed
Because we have four seasons
And multiple reasons
To be the beacons of light for change.


Adaeze Ogbonna is a sophomore studying Journalism and Economics. She writes for the little black girls with big names and even bigger hair.